Graphic Design Schools & Colleges

We live in a visual world, and every day we're bombarded by images from all directions: billboards, magazine covers, Web pages, print ads, television and movies, product packaging, and more. Behind every book cover or company logo that catches our eye is a graphic designer, or a team of designers, who combines text and images to convey a carefully crafted message. Graphic designers may work for advertising firms, publishing houses or design firms, or they may freelance for their own selection of clients.

In a graphic design program, students are taught the basic skills they'll likely need to enter the industry. There are many specialties within the field, but a general graphic design program may touch on Web design, illustration, typography, computer graphics, and animation, as well as more traditional visual arts such as drawing, sculpting or photography. By the time the degree is completed, students typically have compiled a varied portfolio that will help enable them to pursue a number of avenues within the industry. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of May 2011, 191,550 graphic designers were employed in the U.S., earning a national median income of up to $44,010 per year (BLS.gov/oes). The industry is projected to increase by 13% from 2010 to 2020, which gives it a growth rate that's about average compared to other industries (BLS.gov/ooh, 2012).

What does a graphic designer do and who is suited for a career in graphic design?

What education, training, and experience is required to become a graphic designer?

Important things to consider when a choosing a graphic design degree program

What type of graphic design degree programs are available?

What career and job opportunities are available to students with graphic design degrees?

Advertisement
Be the inspiration you seek
Featured Articles